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Searing Steaks

I have seen Chef's use propane torches to brown food items on TV. This makes me wonder if you couldn't use a propane torch to sear steaks instead of building a 500 degree fire to do it? It sure would be simple and quick. What do you guys and gals think?

Comments

  • BonepileBonepile Posts: 10
    edited December 1969
    That sounds like an interesting idea to try sometime. I can't see how it could hurt anything as long as you don't overdo it. I'm going to give it a try next weekend. The dome is full of ribs right now.
  • JonnioJonnio Posts: 47
    edited December 1969
    I wouldn't bother - The whole sear steaks to lock in the juices is actually a myth....The reason to cook good thick steaks at extremely high temperatures really has nothing to do with the juices, what it does is allow you to have a steak with a wonderful crisp and seared exterior while having a uniform and pink medium to medium rare interior.

    That is not something you will accomplish with a blow torch, all that will do is burn the outside and you will still have to cook the rest of the steak.

    (as a follow on in case you don't believe me)
    Many of the "pros" will cook their prime rib ultra slow at first to allow the juices to not be displaced from the meat in the first place. Then, once the cooking is done you can crank the heat and sear the outside for the desired crust. You can do this on prime rib because if the interior is cooked, and then you sear, you won't affect the interior temperature that much. A steak on the other hand does not have that option. If the interior has been cooked already and you sear the exterior you will overcook the steak.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/ceramicchef
  • Joe O.Joe O. Posts: 13
    edited December 1969
    Jonnio wrote on May 17 2009, 09:25 PM:
    I wouldn't bother - The whole sear steaks to lock in the juices is actually a myth....The reason to cook good thick steaks at extremely high temperatures really has nothing to do with the juices, what it does is allow you to have a steak with a wonderful crisp and seared exterior while having a uniform and pink medium to medium rare interior.

    That is not something you will accomplish with a blow torch, all that will do is burn the outside and you will still have to cook the rest of the steak.

    (as a follow on in case you don't believe me)
    Many of the "pros" will cook their prime rib ultra slow at first to allow the juices to not be displaced from the meat in the first place. Then, once the cooking is done you can crank the heat and sear the outside for the desired crust. You can do this on prime rib because if the interior is cooked, and then you sear, you won't affect the interior temperature that much. A steak on the other hand does not have that option. If the interior has been cooked already and you sear the exterior you will overcook the steak.

    I intend to try it regardless of what you say.... I will slow cook it to tenderize it then carefully sear it with a torch. It will not burn the steak any more than a charcoal flame at 500 degrees would.
  • BoomerBoomer Posts: 9
    edited December 1969
    Be prepared for a gassy tasting steak, in order to sear it you have to hold the torch fairly close this gives it a gassy taste....I've tried it and ruined a good steak
  • The BBQ QBThe BBQ QB Posts: 1,482
    edited December 1969
    Hey Joe,

    I know you want to experiment with this, and I applaud you for the effort. Let us know your results. It might be an interesting way to carmelize a rub prior to a flash sear on the Dome too.

    I've gotta say though, the juciest steak I ever had was TREX'd.

    The Dome sears at 700 degrees and comes back down in a reasonable amount of time. (enough to rest the steak). A flash sear on the DD lowered (For grill marks) or on a skillet on the lowered DD will make easy work of what you want to accomplish, and I've got to believe is easier than actually doing it with a torch. It will certainly be more uniform. ( I'm a fan of grill marks which, would be a tough go with a torch)

    Here's a photo of some of my first TREX NY's.

    TRexSteaks.jpg


    Keep us posted on your trial. I'm intrigued and interested in your attempts. Good luck

    Mike D
    TRexSteaks.jpg
    320 x 240 - 49K
    image
    Hickory is a way of Life: Grill Dome my Sensei
  • Joe O.Joe O. Posts: 13
    edited December 1969
    Mike D wrote on May 18 2009, 07:41 PM:
    Hey Joe,

    I know you want to experiment with this, and I applaud you for the effort. Let us know your results. It might be an interesting way to carmelize a rub prior to a flash sear on the Dome too.

    I've gotta say though, the juciest steak I ever had was TREX'd.

    The Dome sears at 700 degrees and comes back down in a reasonable amount of time. (enough to rest the steak). A flash sear on the DD lowered (For grill marks) or on a skillet on the lowered DD will make easy work of what you want to accomplish, and I've got to believe is easier than actually doing it with a torch. It will certainly be more uniform. ( I'm a fan of grill marks which, would be a tough go with a torch)

    Here's a photo of some of my first TREX NY's.

    TRexSteaks.jpg


    Keep us posted on your trial. I'm intrigued and interested in your attempts. Good luck

    Mike D

    Thanks Mike. Those are beautiful steaks!! I also have done T-Rex steaks that were outstanding.

    Another method that I use is the old Weber for the sear and grill marks. I'm not complaining about getting the Grill Dome up to 700 degrees, just trying to figure out an easier way. I sometimes have both going at the same time. At the last count I had a total of five cookers.... One small barrel offset, two webers one large and one small, a gasser and the Grill Dome, but I use the Grill Dome most of the time.
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